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.NET GPU Cloud Computing with Alea GPU

Cloud computing is all about making resources available on demand, and its availability, flexibility, and lower cost has helped it take commercial computing by storm. At the Microsoft Build 2015 conference in San Francisco Microsoft revealed that its Azure cloud computing platform is averaging over 90 thousand new customers per month; contains more than 1.4 million SQL databases being used by hosted applications, and over 50 trillion storage objects; and has 425 million users in the Active Directory system. Microsoft also said that the number of registered developers for Visual Studio Online services increased from 2 to 3 million in less than half a year.

Clearly there is increasing demand for GPU cloud computing. The number of use cases for GPUs in the cloud is growing, and there are a number of ways that GPU cloud computing may be useful to you, including

  • If you need GPUs but don’t have access to them locally;
  • If you are a data scientist and need to scale your machine learning code with multiple GPUs;
  • If you are a developer and want to benchmark your applications on a more recent GPU with the latest CUDA technology; or
  • If you want to use GPUs for video-creation services, 3D visualizations or game streaming.

Cloud computing services are provided at different levels: IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service), PaaS (Platform as a Service) and SaaS (Software as a Service). In this post I will consider two GPU cloud computing use cases, and walk you through setting up and running a sample cloud application using Alea GPU. The first one uses GPUs through IaaS to acclerate .NET applications with Alea GPU on Linux or Windows. The second use case shows how to build a PaaS for GPU computing with Alea GPU and MBrace.

Read more on the NVIDIA Parallel for All blog